13 Again

I feel like I just found a time machine and was transported two decades back in time. You may have seen that American Prospect came out with an article, “The Homeschool Apostates,” that chronicles some of the people who were hurt by the fundamentalist homeschooling world, and how homeschool graduates are pushing back. It’s a pretty long and important article and discusses Homeschoolers Anonymous, which I’m involved with. The article has gotten a lot of press and buzz on Twitter, including from Richard Dawkins (who I really don’t like for lots of reasons, but hey, he’s super famous) and Dan Savage (who I like much better than Dawkins). Plight of homeschooled children with religious wingnut parents: http://t.co/9FxSwfokuJ. Support group here: http://t.co/56Hp3X4v6B — Richard Dawkins (@RichardDawkins) December 6, 2013 Terrific—and depressing—longread: children escaping from homeschooling families. Read: http://t.co/eXKMiiCcGs — Dan Savage (@fakedansavage) December 6, 2013 ICYMI: Compelling piece about kids abused[…]

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“Not all Christians are like that”, or, why I support the NALT Project

When I first saw about the launch of the NALT Christians Project, my reaction was, “Good, finally somebody telling people to put up or shut up when they use the "not all Christians are like that” line.“ I suppose I should have expected controversy, people don’t like being told that their favorite platitude isn’t particularly useful or helpful. I didn’t, however, expect so many straight Christian progressives absolutely losing it, and in the process deciding that they’re the ones who get to speak for all LGBT people. The same straight Christian progressives who get mad when men deign to speak for women have demonstrated no problem speaking for all LGBT people.  And so, since I’ve already written a piece to non-affirming Christians, this piece is dedicated to the straight Christian progressives who are too busy chiming in to actually listen. Dear straight progressive Christians, this isn’t about you. Not really. Sure,[…]

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Why I can’t even get mad about The Gospel Coalition’s gay marriage and “gag reflex” piece

The Gospel Coalition, a site whose relevance to the Christian community and legitimacy as a voice for Christianity and the Gospel should already be called into doubt by their continued association with the abuse-covering-up C.J. Mahaney of Sovereign Grace Ministries, ran a piece by Thabiti Anyabwile titled The Importance of Your Gag Reflex When Discussing Homosexuality and “Gay Marriage”. It’s a post that has generated quite a bit of well-deserved outrage in progressive Christian circles, and for good reason as it is a truly awful piece of writing. The following quote is just a sample of the sort of things that are in the piece, though to avoid activating your own gag reflex, I shan’t quote any of the worst bits, though if you’re feeling sensitive to hateful writing you should probably stop reading here. I’ve put the rest below the jump so you can just skip past this post. Reject the unbiblical[…]

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Millennials and the church, or, How evangelicals turned me into a cynic

It seems that everyone these days is talking about millennials leaving the church. CNN even gave Rachel Held Evans valuable front page real estate to write about it. Since everyone else is writing about it, I figure I might as well add my two cents, especially because I feel like nobody’s actually asking those of us who have left or are leaving the evangelical world. This is my story. Ahh, but Kathryn, you say, isn’t everyone saying that millennials are leaving the church because of how evangelicals treat LGBT people? Aren’t you just another example of that? Here’s the thing though. While that may be the cherry on top of the icing on the cake, it’s a far cry from having anything to do with what turned me into a cynic.  I’m a cynic about American evangelicalism. I might as well just say it. I don’t trust evangelical leaders and[…]

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More on Christian culture and consent

For those of you who are unfamiliar with how Tumblr, the blogging platform I use, works, one of the big features is the ability for reblog others’ posts and add your comments to the post. One blogger who reblogged my post added a lengthy comment that I think deserves further discussion.  *** This blogger suggested that discussion of consent needs to be motivated by something outside of the individual, and suggested that the motivation should be doing what Jesus wants. Now, while I do not in any way disagree that faith can definitely play a role in the discussion, if the only reason for making sure that the other party is giving full consent is because to do otherwise makes Baby Jesus cry, then if you remove faith from the discussion you have no framework for ethical sexual behavior. If consent is only about what Jesus wants, then what about[…]

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So this is how the religious right tosses out people who are no longer useful

World Magazine today posted Andree Seu Peterson’s column, “Remember the Signs,” from their upcoming July 26th issue. The piece is about Exodus International disbanding and presents the Gay Christian Network as the enemy (remember, in christianese, “the enemy” means “satan”) leading Alan Chambers away from the truth. Oh, yeah, and she pretty much says that Alan Chambers is also a tool of satan and a heretic now too. It doesn’t matter that he still believes basically the same thing that World does, their one time “Daniel of the Year” decides to be nicer about it and stop being used as a tool of anti-gay religious right politics and they turn on him. This was going to be a snarky and sarcastic rant like my post about Marvin Olasky’s persecution complex DOMA scare piece was, but I think instead I’m going to to talk about how Christian culture uses people and then[…]

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Brokenness

I get it now. I think I finally get it. For the longest time, I haven’t been able to understand why it is that when I try to explain to people within the church that it’s incredibly harmful to gay kids to grow up in a church world that tells them that they’re fundamentally broken, the only response I get is bafflement at why I’d think that telling kids they’re broken is a problem. I mean, it seems obvious to me. Teaching kids that they’re broken and repeating it so often that they internalize the message is a bad thing, why would anyone think it’s no big deal?  I finally figured it out. It’s because so much of the evangelical world, or at least the reformed part of the evangelical world, teaches every child that they’re broken. They don’t see why it’s bad to tell gay kids that they’re broken[…]

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Let’s Talk About Tim Tebow for a Minute

I don’t know Tim Tebow, never met the guy, though from what I’ve heard from people who knew him at UF, he’s a genuinely good guy. He’s definitely someone I’d rather have representing the University of Florida than some of the other famous alumni. What I can say for certain though, is that Tim Tebow is no saint. Wait, wait, before you get the angry mob with pitchforks and torches to come after me, hear me out. Tim Tebow is no saint because nobody is. We’re all flawed human beings trying to figure out how to live our lives, and nobody is perfect. Nobody can be perfect. Even if Tebow is the nicest guy to ever walk the planet other than Jesus himself, he’s still not perfect. Perfection is impossible. Not only that, but we don’t all agree on what “perfect" even is. No one can possibly keep everyone happy. […]

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The one thing I can’t write about

For a time during my pre-teen and teen years, I was involved with Operation Rescue. Been there, done that, have the t-shirts (t-shirts I can’t bring myself to throw away). I’ve tried time and again over the years to sit down and write about that time in my life and I can’t do it. Not that there aren’t pages of text in “draft" folders of long-abandoned blogs, and various files on my computer, but none of it ever seems right.  How do you even begin to discuss a very influential time in your life when it’s something that so few people have lived through and that was, to be honest, more than a little weird? How do you explain just how surreal it was to be at the state capital lobbying with Equality Florida when the last time you were there wandering those halls was as a kid who was[…]

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No, Marvin Olasky, the DOMA ruling doesn’t mean you’ll soon have to chose between silence or jail

Perhaps I’m just a glutton for punishment, but every so often I feel the need to check out what one-time trustee at my alma mater, editor-in-chief of World Magazine (who would use that position to write thinly-veiled screeds about Covenant turning liberal), author of the Newt Gingrich-pimped The Tragedy of American Compassion (and of the super racist, orientalist, poor-excuse-for-a-novel Scimitar’s Edge, among other books), architect of “compassionate conservatism,” Marvin Olasky has to say about world events. What he has to say about yesterday’s DOMA ruling is an absolute doozie.  Because I’m bored and because the hyperbole, panic, and overall insanity of the piece is absolutely hilarious, I am going to do point-by-point commentary forthwith.  Justice Antonin Scalia’s dissent in today’s Supreme Court same-sex saga is stinging the left, which is hitting back with headlines like “Top 10 Rage Quotes from Scalia’s DOMA Dissent.” No, Marvin, Scalia’s dissent is not “stinging the left.” We’re too[…]

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